Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 18, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

4:00 pm
it the rain gets heavier and it separates brighter, but fresher conditions pushing into the west and the warmest weather still in the south—east corner. temperatures above 20 celsius. this is bbc news. ryanair says it expects claims of around 20 million euros after plans to cancel up to 50 flights a day. we will hear from the company's boss, michael 0'leary in the next few minutes, we will bring you that to you live from dublin. police are still questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing — including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. after borisjohnson is accused of back—seat driving over brexit — theresa may insists the government is being "driven from the front." donald trump tells the united nations to make itself more efficient. we seek a united nations that regains the trust of the people around the world. in order to achieve this, the united nations must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistle— blowers, and focus on results rather than on process. also in the next hour:
4:01 pm
around the world in less than 80 days... everyday i ride until at least half past nine at night, riding an average of 240 miles per day. british endurance cyclist mark beaumont heads for paris with a new world record in his sights. and new cause for concern in the caribbean. hurricane maria it's on its way, heading towards the leeward islands. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. ryanair says it expects to pay out more that 20 million euros in compensation following cancellations of up to 50 flights a day for six weeks. the company's share price has taken a tumble and up to 400,000
4:02 pm
passengers could be affected. the problems stem from a change to the company's pilots‘ rotas — and ryanair is coming pressure to publish a full list of the flights that could get cancelled in advance. let's talk to our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz, who is with us bbcbizlive. we are waiting for michael 0'leary for the news conference, but he is under huge pressure —— who is with us now. yes, under huge pressure. they have made these announcements, very short notice, 40 or 50 flights a day cancelled over a period of six weeks. 400,000 passengers affected, but we only know which flights up until wednesday, so the result of thatis until wednesday, so the result of that is there are so many more people who are not able to know when they will be able to travel on the holidays. he is just they will be able to travel on the holidays. he isjust taking his
4:03 pm
seat... let's cross live to dublin where michael 0'leary, the chief executive of ryanair, is giving a press conference. he is about to speak. if we can get the pictures out of the way... ladies and gentlemen, all very welcome. thanks for coming here at reasonably short notice. have we handed out the press releases? 0k, reasonably short notice. have we handed out the press releases? ok, i thought what we might try to do given the uncertainty we managed to create over the weekend of the plan to cancel up to 50 flights a day over the next six weeks is hold a press briefing here this afternoon, then tried to deal with... explain then tried to deal with... explain theissue, then tried to deal with... explain the issue, and deal with any questions people may have. here is the factual position. 0n questions people may have. here is the factual position. on friday afternoon we took the decision to cancel an average oi’ afternoon we took the decision to cancel an average or slightly under 50 flights a day for the next six weeks. we did so because for the previous eight or nine days our
4:04 pm
punctuality had fallen from something of an average of about 90% to under 70%, for two reasons. firstly, we are suffering a lot of atc and weather delays. secondly, while all of our schedules are fully crewed, air traffic control delays and weather delays are knocking into the following day's flights because of crew hours, and we are also from the 1st of september trying to allocate a large amount of annual leave principally to our pilots, in blocks of four weeks. so we went through... sorry, we have been going through... sorry, we have been going through the summer period without allocating much annual leave which is why we were able to run the full summer is why we were able to run the full summer schedule to the busiest months ofjune, july and august without much significant disruption. in fact we carried 12.7 million passengers in august, an increase in 10% over the traffic we carried the previous august. we are not short of pilots. we presently have over 4200
4:05 pm
pilots. we presently have over 4200 pilots in ryanair, an average or accruing ratio of just pilots in ryanair, an average or accruing ratio ofjust over 5%, about 5.2% officers per aircraft, and generally each aircraft only requires two kroos per day. what we have messed up is allocation of holidays and trying to over allocate holidays and trying to over allocate holidays during september and 0ctober while we are still running most of the summer schedule, and while we are still sunning most of the summer schedule and taking flight the summer schedule and taking flight delays, because principally ofair flight delays, because principally of air traffic control and weather disruptions. and not trying to blame air traffic control or weather disruptions. the blame for this lies with us, but we have tried to over allocate leave to pilots in september and october while still running a busy summer schedule and we don't have enough stand—by coverage to be able to cover the inevitable disruptions that happen around this time of the year. why does that change occur only in the first week of september? it occurred
4:06 pm
because we had an unusual situation in ryanairthis because we had an unusual situation in ryanair this year, moving from a 12 month leave period, and sorry, this is somewhat technical. we would historically have allocated a relief from april through to the 21st of march, what we would call a fiscal year. the iaa required us starting onjanuary year. the iaa required us starting on january 2018 to allocate leave according to a calendar annual year, saw another word until the 31st of december from the 1st of january, so —— so december from the 1st of january, so —— so in other words until the 31st of january. we are trying to allocate this from the 1st of april 2017 until the 21st of december —— sist 2017 until the 21st of december —— 31st of december 2017 and we simply do not have enough pilots in the month of september or october to be able to allocate this volume of leave. the leave is being allocated to pilots as part of our working conditions. we allocate them and they get six weeks per year, but four of that comes in one block, and
4:07 pm
we have been trying to allocate this big lumpy block in the month of september, so in the first weekend while we had reasonably good punctuality through june, july and august, no disruptions, noel crew shortages, we published rosters for both the month of september and 0ctober both the month of september and october that showed all of our flights being crewed and operated, but as we take disruptions, particularly over the weekend, thunderstorms over barcelona, an error craft missing a curfew in dusseldorf on sunday. as i crew when a new craft gets stuck we have no back—up available and that knocks into the entire schedule. we have two choices then. we can either run the operation with 55—60% punctuality, with former flight disruptions, cancellations, and huge passenger dissatisfaction caused to 35-40% of passenger dissatisfaction caused to 35—40% of our customer base, or we do what i thought last friday was the sensible thing. we need to take out about 50 flights a day for the
4:08 pm
next six weeks while we have this crew issue, cancel those flights, and thereby create additional stand—by pilots and additional stand—by pilots and additional stand—by aircraft that will enable us stand—by aircraft that will enable us to bring the punjabi back up to 90%, and eliminate the risk of further cancellations over the next six weeks —— bring the punctuality backed up to 90%. we note of it —— notified of the passengers due to travel up until wednesday of this week. yes, it was short notice. yes, it was unexpected, and for that i sincerely apologise, but we were doing our best at short notice to communicate with those passengers most likely to be immediately affected. 0ver most likely to be immediately affected. over the weekend and today we have now finalised a list of cancellations that will run over the next about six weeks until the end of october. and i think what we have tried to do, and the reason we are running slightly delayed... you
4:09 pm
know, why don't we just publish the list? we spend most of the weekend finding where we can cancel at the bigger bases, dublin, stansted, rome, where we can cancel flights but on... 0ut rome, where we can cancel flights but on... out of approach where we have multiple daily frequencies to london, dublin, milan out of rome, madrid and barcelona, and that by kicking out one of the lines of flying out of those busier bases, we will have many more alternatives to communicate to passengers rather than just telling them, sorry, the flight than just telling them, sorry, the flight is cancelled. go away. what we are trying to do is cancel flights on the busy routes like dublin to amsterdam which we operate four times daily, that may be reduced to three times daily. dublin to sta nsted, reduced to three times daily. dublin to stansted, for reduced to three times daily. dublin to sta nsted, for example, reduced to three times daily. dublin to stansted, for example, might be reduced to 11 times daily, so on and so reduced to 11 times daily, so on and so forth. that is why we have had a delay over the weekend, trying to work out these cancellations, or allocate them to those routes where we can offer passengers the most amount of alternatives. we have given you today, this afternoon, the
4:10 pm
press release. what i have tried to explain in the press release, we have cancelled one line of flying at one, two, three... nine of our busiest airports and bases, two lines at stansted. what we mean by a lines at stansted. what we mean by a line of flying, see, for example come in barcelona, we have 12 lanes of the aircraft based there that is one full day of flying. we will take out one of those 12 full days of flying, and generally speaking, though, on routes where we have other flights that day and we will now be issuing e—mails to all of our customers this evening, as well as posting the attached notices on our website and social media pages, and website and social media pages, and we have given you a sample, for example, of what flight cancellations will take place on monday the 25th of september, second, ninth, 16th and the 23rd of 0ctober. second, ninth, 16th and the 23rd of october. in total there will be put —— total there will be 50 cast on
4:11 pm
mondays, 44 on tuesdays, 48 on thursdays, 52 on friday this works out at an average of 48 flight this works out at an average of 48 flight cancellations per day. this is large number of flight cancellations but to put it in some context we are operating more than 2500 daily flights, so it amounts to less tha n 2500 daily flights, so it amounts to less than 2% of the total flying. i don't want in any way to diminish or play down the inconvenience that would be caused to the 2% of passengers who will be affected by these cancellations, but i do want to point out that 98% of our flight and 98% of our customers will not in any way be affected by these cancellations. and the reason we have taken the decision is because thatis have taken the decision is because that is what best protects those 98% of flight and customers. it minimises there are delays and it eliminates the risk of any other scheduled cancellations because of the crew leave issue. all customers
4:12 pm
on these flights through to the end of october will receive an e—mail this evening highlighting firstly the alternative flights they can tra nsfer the alternative flights they can transfer to, hopefully on the same or at worst the next day. if they are not satisfied with the alternative offered, they can have a full refund and they will all be entitled to their eu compensation entitlements. we will not be trying to claim exceptional circumstances. this is our mess up. when we make a mess in ryanair will come out with our hands up and we try to explain why we have made it, and when we will pay compensation to those passengers, which will be those flights cancelled over the next two weeks. in terms of its impact on the company, weeks. in terms of its impact on the com pa ny, clearly weeks. in terms of its impact on the company, clearly there is large reputational impact for which again i apologise and we will try to do better in future. in terms of lost profitability, we think it will cost us profitability, we think it will cost us something in the order of up to about 5 million euros in the next six weeks, and in terms of the eu compensation we think it will be something up to a maximum of 20 million euros but it much depends on
4:13 pm
how many of the alternative flights our customers take up over that period of time —— it will cost us up to 500 million euros. i want to apologise, firstly to the 400,000 customers affected by these over the next few weeks. i want to apologise also to the 18 or 20 million customers over the next six weeks who were unnecessarily worried over the weekend and have been worried, will my flight be cancelled? we were so will my flight be cancelled? we were so focused i think on friday about dealing with the weekend's cancellations we didn't focus on the concern or worry we would cause to passengers whose flight will not be affected at all over the next six weeks, and that accounts to some 18 million passengers. again to put in some context the 400,000 passengers whose flights will be cancelled but whose flights will be cancelled but who will be offered alternative flights. i say sorry on behalf of ryanair. i flights. i say sorry on behalf of rya nair. i say flights. i say sorry on behalf of ryanair. i say we want to put our
4:14 pm
hands which is what we do when we make a mess, and we will try to learn from the mistakes we have made in this case we clearly messed up in our rostering department. we should and should have been a better early warning signal coming through the months ofjuly and august that this... that there were going to be operational disruptions in september because we could only barely cover the roster but did not have sufficient stand—by crews. two other issues i want to touch briefly on. there has been a lot of speculation, mostly wildly unfounded, as to the outcome of the case in brussels last week. the case is one of jurisdiction only and will not affect irish contracts. we are required by law, for pilots and cabin crew operating irish aircraft, to have them on irish contract and they will continue on irish contracts. those irish contracts may have to affect more of the laboured or social conditions in other countries, but they already reflect that because irish labour law
4:15 pm
reflects your requirements, which is what drives most other labour obligations in other eu countries. it will not cost us anything in terms of additional pay. it will not cost us anything in terms of union recognition. there is this misleading kind of impression, mainly created by unions, that somehow ryanair prohibits people joining unions. the irish constitution has for many years guaranteed freedom of association. everybody in rya nair who guaranteed freedom of association. everybody in ryanair who works for ryanair is free to join a union. if they want to do so they are free to do so. we, however, are free to continue to negotiate with our people and we will continue to do so. people and we will continue to do so. it will not lead to unionisation in ryanair. nor will it lead to material changes in our irish contracts. the one most significant one we can think of that we have found thus far is for example we would typically have 12 months probation under our irish contracts. in germany, there is a legal preclusion on anything more than six months of probation, so for example
4:16 pm
the only significant outcome of mons at this point in time on our irish contracts, we may have to reduce the probationary period from 12—6 months in germany. everyone. there are union entitlements and rights etc because they are protected under irish legislation as irish legislation has adopted most of the eu requirements. the one other issue is al italia, process we are in the foothills. there is a third round of offers due to be made for people acquiring al italia and that will be the first round of binding offers due to be submitted by the end of september. we will certainly be submitting an offer for alitalia. we will be among one of eight to ten, 12 party submitting offers for alitalia. we are not as some of the papers reported last week about to buy alitalia. we may make an offer but it will take 4—6 months i think
4:17 pm
for those offers to be completed. i think that is everything i wanted to cover. before any questions, any issues i have left out in dealing with the rosters... do i think this will happen again in 2018? no. what is different in 2018, by the way, as we move on the 1st of january is different in 2018, by the way, as we move on the 1st ofjanuary again at the dillian and their insistence, 12 month annual leave period. so we have 12 months in which to get rid of these four are six—week blocks of pilot holidays. the difficulty we are dealing with that september and 0ctober are dealing with that september and october is we're trying to get rid ofa october is we're trying to get rid of a disproportionate amount of four week blocks of holidays for pilots while still running much of the schedule through september and 0ctober. schedule through september and october. the 1st of november, we move into the winter schedule with less flying and we have more room to allocate annual leave. with that at this i will open up to questions. yes. we are not in a mess, by the way. we have clearly messed up 2% of ourflights, which way. we have clearly messed up 2% of our flights, which is way. we have clearly messed up 2% of ourflights, which is somewhat
4:18 pm
different to the other 98% of flights that will be unaffected. new slogan is always getting better. clearly for these passengers that is not true —— your slogan. how much do you personally take responsibility for this, given the fact that this could have been predicted for something, and how it has been handled? how have you personally helped to damage their beautician of your company? and argued saying there is no problem with the intention of pilots at the moment? norwegian here seems to be suggesting that there is a problem with retention of your pilots —— norwegian air. 0k, a couple of different questions on that. how is agb going? brett lee. last year we had 12.7 million passengers, all 3% of our seats not filled. passengers are loving the changes we made, and the more customer friendly policies. that does not mean that from time to time we don't make mess ups, and we do, and this is clearly a mess up. i
4:19 pm
ta ke do, and this is clearly a mess up. i take responsibility for the mess up, it is mine and therefore i have to clea n it is mine and therefore i have to clean it up. does it affect? the remarkable progress ryanair has made, under the heading to the back a lwa ys made, under the heading to the back always getting better banner‘s no, i don't think it does. the passengers continue to support what we're doing both undertake it always getting better by lowering our airfare by 6%. have i damaged ryanair with his cancellations? yes. but i would rather damage the reputation of ryanair by rather damage the reputation of rya nair by cancelling rather damage the reputation of ryanair by cancelling 50 flights a day, less than 2% of our flights, than significantly delaying 40% of ourflights, which than significantly delaying 40% of our flights, which would than significantly delaying 40% of ourflights, which would be something in the order of about 800 flights a day. we are going to disrupt and inconvenience some 2% of our passengers in the interests of minimising the inconvenience and the delay is being suffered by the other 98%, and for that i take personal responsibility, and i sincerely question. weather leave granted to
4:20 pm
pilots this year, is it on a pro rata basis rather than a full year given within the nine—month period? so it is nine months rather than a 12 month block, and secondly... let me hearagain 12 month block, and secondly... let me hear again the first part of that question. are we sure pilots? no, we are not. we have 4200 pilots today. we don't agree with the norwegian figure. as far as we can tell, yes, we have lost some two norwegian this year, we have lost some two norwegian this yea r, less we have lost some two norwegian this year, less than 100, the figure. we have also recruited some pilots from norwegian this year. they are coming to us last year and this year. there isa to us last year and this year. there is a flow of pilots. to put that in some context, taking ourfigure, less tha n some context, taking ourfigure, less than 100, that is less than 3% of our pilots. we do lose pilots. typically our rate of attrition on them is less than 5% and it is merely going to long—haul airline. norwegian are offering long haul flights on 787s and there are some
4:21 pm
young and somewhat innocent and bewildered pilots who think the grass is greener flying bewildered pilots who think the grass is greenerflying long haul for airlines who can't make any money. the air island pilots are dealing with that at the moment and i think the norwegian pilots will be coming back to us in the not too distant future —— the air burling pilots are dealing with that at the moment. to answer the question, yes, they went from having a 30 day leave entitlement to something like a 24 leave entitlement. what we messed up, andi leave entitlement. what we messed up, and i think trying to be nice to our pilots, we agreed to allocate maintained their four—week block. so ina maintained their four—week block. so in a normal 12 month year where we give away six weeks of holidays, you get a four—week block together, which is by the way 20 days plus... 16, 3060 block apologies. we said we tried to preserve the four—week block —— 36 daily block of holidays.
4:22 pm
we are writing to 0liver pilots today and looking for people to buy back some of that lee for them, and if we don't get enough sufficient diggers are people who want to sell us diggers are people who want to sell us back some of the leave we will cancel some of it as well —— we are writing to all of our pilots today and looking for people to buy back some of that leave. how do you prevent disruption happening... michael 0'leary there are dealing with questions, and there was a long statement first of all. simon gompertz is still with me here. i mean, he is open. "we messed up. " but it is a fairly basic elland, a calendar mess up? yes, we see declination. the pilots have to cram their holiday into a shorter period because they are changing when the end of years, so they have this chunk of holiday which is four weeks that they tend to take together, and
4:23 pm
because of the busy summer schedule they have tended to take that in september and october, and then that was ok, they had a very fragile rota, because as soon as something went down, and there have been weather problems, air—traffic control problems, across europe, that michael 0'leary referred to, then the rota fell apart. the question has to arise from that. this is what an airline does. their expertise is to be able to manage not just the planes expertise is to be able to manage notjust the planes themselves around so many distant countries through all that airspace, but the staff within them. so their expertise to do that, although michael 0'leary took the responsibility upon himself, i wouldn't have liked to have been in that roster department when he walked in on friday to say, what happened? or the pr department. as he mentioned, there is massive reputational damage to a big airline here. big reputational damage. he tried to play that don't saying it is just affecting 2% of passengers because the will be ok, and he has
4:24 pm
counted the cost. 5 million euros of profits, 20 million euros being the cost of compensation, around £17.5 million. so people will get the compensation they think... you are entitled to around £200 compensation for short—haulflight entitled to around £200 compensation for short—haul flight cancelled. if you do the maths and provide the £17.5 million by 400,000 passengers affected you only get around £40, so he is calculating that a lot of people won't get it. two reasons. 0ne people won't get it. two reasons. one is they have concentrated these cancelled flights on those hubs, you heard. like sta nsted, cancelled flights on those hubs, you heard. like stansted, with a lot of their flights leave from, and they think they will be able to push people on the other ones which would cause too much disruption and they wa nt cause too much disruption and they want have to pay compensation. —— will not cause too much disruption and they will not have to pay competition. but also as long as they give people two weeks' notice for their cancelled flights, they don't have to pay it either. some hope for the council passengers, but for now, thank you. i want to take
4:25 pm
you to ottawa in ontario in canada because of the last few minutes the prime minister theresa may has arrived, to lay the foundations for arrived, to lay the foundations for a post—brexit trade deal with canada, this of course amid the ongoing row over the government approach to the withdrawal from the european union. anyway, a new trade deal between the uk and canada is due to come into effect on the 1st of september, a limiting 90% of canadian import duties —— eliminating 90% of canadian import duties. but on the plane in the last half—hour, talking to journalists, she made an effective rebuke to the foreign secretary who had been accused of the last few days of back—seat driving, in his remarks over withdrawal from the eu. back—seat driving, in his remarks over withdrawalfrom the eu. and back—seat driving, in his remarks over withdrawal from the eu. and the cost of it to britain. the prime minister telling journalists on the plane that the government "is driven from the front." so the formalities under way in ottawa, justin trudeau
4:26 pm
that canadian prime minister they are, with theresa may, before the substantive talks get underway. two other news... to other news... police are continuing to question two men who were arrested after a device partially exploded on the tube in south west london on friday, leaving 30 people injured. police have been searching a chicken shop in hounslow in west london, where a 21—year—old man was detained on saturday night on suspicion of terror offences. he's a syrian refugee who appears to have been living in the uk for four years. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. this is a 24/7 investigation. late last night, detectives were still removing potential evidence from a fast food shop in hounslow, west london. it was raided on saturday. they'd arrested one man here, surrounding him with offices in overalls, a precaution to ensure any potential forensic evidence on his clothes is not contaminated. he is 21—year—old yahyah faroukh, believed to be from syria. the bbc has been told he worked in the shop, which is being searched by detectives.
4:27 pm
ya hyah fa roukh lives in this modern development, close to the southern boundary of heathrow airport. it's also been taped off, and is being subjected to a close search. he is linked to this house in sunbury—on—thames, about five miles away, still surrounded by metal barriers and tents put up to protect evidence. this picture of yahyah faroukh was taken in the street outside of the house, and posted online nearly five months ago. ron and pennyjones, who live here, have fostered teenage asylum seekers. he may have been one of them. neighbours say another young man who arrived a few weeks ago appeared desperate to run away, and came to the attention of the police. i saw one arguing with him. so i went out and asked what was wrong.
4:28 pm
it was a new kid, 15, didn't want to come into the house, he came from kent and he said he wanted to go to london. numerous police cars were parked outside the house when i drove past, but it's been ramped up over the last 2—3 months, with police coming out to the house. the police get called, so that's why there will be a police presence at the house. whether it means that the lad has actually caused trouble per se, who is to know? it is speculation. police say an 18—year—old linked to this address was arrested in dover and is being questioned. cctv evidence is at the corner of the investigation. —— cctv evidence is at the core of the investigation. this image obtained by itv news was captured close to the house in sunbury—on—thames. the key question — did this man with a lidl bag place a bomb on the london underground, also in a lidl bag? burning and terrifying innocent commuters. tom symons, bbc news. tom mentioned the cctv pictures from
4:29 pm
itv news. let's bring you these images which we received in the last hour from the sun newspaper, which is claimed to be recent cctv footage from friday morning before the attack. it shows a man carrying a lidl bag, heading in the direction of sunbury rail station. it's too early to say whether it's the same man in the cctv footage we brought you earlier. but the sun claims it was captured some 16 minutes after the teen was first spotted on another surveillance camera near the property that's being searched in sunbury—on—thames. and more on the arrests in hounslow in west london, where a 21—year—old man, believed to be yahyah faroukh — a refugee from syria was arrested after he finished his shift at a fried chicken shop on saturday night. suleman sarwar is one of the owners of the take—out and has been speaking to reporters. the police didn't tell us anything about the investigation. they gave no details out —
4:30 pm
they searched lockers, and that was it. we were closed here for four hours, and then they went. what was he like? we don't know him very well. yes, he was employed over here. he was quite quiet. he just worked over here and that was it. how long was he here for? i don't know those details. i work here mainly in the front, so i don't know the details of how long he was here. yes, he is familiar. we do recognise him. i recognise him as a member of staff, so, yes, he was working here. what was he doing? mainly he wasjust making chicken. where was he from? i believe originally he probably was from syria, so he was probably a refugee. i don't know those details. is another hurricane is bearing down on the eastern caribbean and has just been strengthened it a category storm. american forecasters say
4:31 pm
hurricane maria will hit the leeward islands of the it is expected to hit the british virgin islandsjust islands of the it is expected to hit the british virgin islands just ten days since they were devastated by hurricane irma. but hurricane maria expected to hit with winds of 120mph. we will keep a track on that as will matt taylor who can brick bring us a forecast. we will keep you updated on maria. still cool out there as we head into the evening rush hour. the speck of cloud across england and wales an indication of lively showers. more cloud through eastern parts of scotla nd cloud through eastern parts of scotland and northern england. patchier, lighter rain and drizzle here. the best of the evening brightness will be out towards the west, but wherever you are, a cool
4:32 pm
end to the day and as the outbreaks of rain fizzle out tonight from england and wales, the skies clear. a few mist and fog patches will form and temperatures take a tumble. most starting tuesday morning with temperatures in single figures. there will be a few showers around on tuesday, but the emphasis is on few. most of you will avoid them, staying dry with sunny spells. more cloud into the west later on in the day, but with lighter winds and that bit more sunshine around it should feel warmer. temperatures peaking at between 15 and 18 celsius. more updates in half an hour. i will see you then. hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy. the headlines at 4.32pm: ryanair have rya nair have admitted ryanair have admitted they messed
4:33 pm
up: the chief executive admitted the airline's reputation had been damaged and apologised to passengers. police are still questioning two men arrested after the bomb attack on a tube train in parsons green — they are believed to be a 21—year—old syrian refugee and an 18—year—old man. donald trump has addressed the united nations calling for cuts in bureaucracy and saying that the organisation is not living up to its potential. foreign secretary borisjohnson has been accused by some of "back seat driving" over brexit, but the prime minister insists the government is united. a cyclist who killed a woman while riding an illegal track bike is sentenced to 18 months in a young offenders' institution. wayne rooney has pleaded guilty to a charge of drink driving at a court in stockport. the footballer has been sentenced to 100 hours of unpaid work and received a two year ban from driving. it is time for the sport. here is
4:34 pm
hugh. england women's manager mark sampson insists he's not allowing the recent controversy surrounding eni aluko's discrimination case to affect the team's preparations for their opening world cup qualifier against russia. forward aluko and midfielder drew spence have both submitted evidence against sampson who has been cleared of any wrongdoing by two separate investigations. the important thing is to be professional. we understand that there is a huge media interest and public interest in the investigations, but from our point of view, the players have got a job to do. we are representing england tomorrow and these players have worked incredibly hard their whole lives to be to be given the opportunity to represent england and we are focussed on that and making sure we can produce the best we can. i have made it clear my stance on the allegations and as we sit now, we are 24 hours away from an important world cup qualifier and we are asking people to respect that's the case. mark sampson has been fantastic for my career. he gave me a chance initially
4:35 pm
to play for england and not onlyjust getting the opportunity, it's the technical detail. it's improving me as a footballer and as a person. i have said it before, and i'll say it again, this is the most together team i've ever been involved in. the most positive environment and best team culture i have been involved in and i have been involved with a lot of clubs and so that along with the football side of things has really helped me develop as a player. efl cup ties dominate the midweek football with 16 ties spread across tuesday and wednesday. they include another chance for tottenham to win their first domestic fixture at their new temporary home wembley. we can do better. we are struggling maybe to take some because we dropped many points at wembley in the three games that we have played against chelsea, burnley and swansea and we won against everton and newcastle. we started well in
4:36 pm
the champions league. iam happy. england and the west indies begin their five match one—day series at old trafford tomorrow. jonny bairstow has been selected to open the batting with alex hales. ten years after turning professional, rory mcilroy has been added to the field for next week's british masters at close house in the tournament where he made his pro debut. the world number eight is joined in northumberland by several of his 2016 ryder cup teammates, including masters champion sergio garcia and tournament host lee westwood. the northern irishman failed to qualify for the pga tour's season ending tour championship yesterday in his attempt to defend the fedexcup title he won last year. the three—time squash world champion nick matthew has announced that he'll retire at the end
4:37 pm
of the forthcoming season. the former world number one could play his last event at the british open in the spring. before that matthew will bid to win a fourth world title in manchester at the end of the year and another commonwealth games gold next april. retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, retirement is sometimes a dirty word, ithink, in retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, in sport. retirement is sometimes a dirty word, ithink, in sport. you retirement is sometimes a dirty word, i think, in sport. you get it askedit word, i think, in sport. you get it asked it all the time which is one of the reasons i wanted to announce it and get it out in the open and concentrate on what i do best or what i will do best nor the next year at least. it is nice that it is in my own hands. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. more now on the questioning of two men who were arrested after a device partially exploded on the tube in south west london on friday. dr david lowe is a former counter terrorism detective and now a lecturer in crime and security atjohn moores university liverpool. it is becoming clear that a lot of
4:38 pm
cctv is emerging which will show them what? with knowing the time of them what? with knowing the time of the explosion and of course, the extensive cctv that london underground have, this will try and get that pattern there and look at what actually planted the device and any associates who are, ing what actually planted the device and any associates who are,ing with them. i look at how it has gone over them. i look at how it has gone over the last couple of days and the metropolitan police's counter—terrorism unit, s015 have been effective in the investigation along with security services no doubt will have. despite the fact that the threat level was downgraded, the message clearly is we all still need to be very slinlg lant? without doubt, simon. it has been downgraded, but we're at severe. this is a very, very high level. we have been there now since july 2014. so, it has been with us
4:39 pm
u nfortu nately for july 2014. so, it has been with us unfortunately for sometime. an attack is highly likely. that's what that means. and you know, even this year we have had five attacks, the metropolitan police commissioner came out saying that a number of attacks have been prevented. we can play a part and be vigilant and if we see something suspicious, report it. looking less and less like a lone wolf attack? yes. it is a phrase i'm not too keen on because there is rarely a lone wolf. there is normally somebody else in the background who has encouraged them, who had an influence on them and certainly, may have supported them with equivalent or making plans or travel plans, there is always someone somewhere travel plans, there is always someone somewhere in the background andi someone somewhere in the background and i think this investigation highlighted this. it looks as
4:40 pm
though, this is maybe why we have come down to severe because there is no other threat that another device is likely in the immediate future, but again, we are seeing two individuals who have been arrested. of course, we have got to remember, they have been arrested and they have not been charged. there is a long way to go in the due process yet. no, for sure. one has been named already, he was arrested in huns low. i'm just wondering, without obviously going into specifics, it is a pattern, isn't it, of the sort of life, the sort of people that the people just need to be aware of and just have an eye open? that's right. it is that thing of looking for anyone who is not behaving as one would in a certain situation. you know, there is the anti—terrorism hot line that we can access and it is available on the metropolitan police's website or
4:41 pm
even 999 if we are in an area, tell the security or the police something is not quite right and it will be dealt with sensitively. the people will, the police will not be like a bull out a gate with it, they will deal with things sensitively, but this shows you that we just can't ta ke this shows you that we just can't take things for granted at the moment. dr david lowe, thank you. the prime minister has insisted her "government is driven from the front." following comments that the foreign secretary borisjohnson was back seat driving after his controversial article about brexit. meanwhile the most senior official in the government's brexit department has left his job, after reports of tensions between him and the brexit secretary david davis. 0liver robbins is moving to downing street to work more directly for theresa may. a spokesman for number ten said the appointment would "strengthen coordination" of brexit across the government, as the next round of negotiations
4:42 pm
with brussels approaches. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports. the most eye—catching claim from the referendum campaign — since widely discredited, but this weekend boris johnson revived it, saying that brexit would mean roughly retrieving about that much of an eu, and arguing it would be a fine thing that was spent on the nhs. it led to the uk's most senior statistics official, sir david norgrove, saying he was surprised and disappointed the foreign secretary had chosen to revisit the number, warning it was a clear misuse of figures. boris johnson hit back, saying his article had been wilfully distorted and misrepresented. as statisticians the test that we must set ourselves, are we clarifying the big debates of the day? it is not ourjob as the statistical community to tell you what the answer is. but the british public have a right to know what the real numbers are and put them into context. that is what the statistics authority was try to do on this occasion. so what does the argument over the figure centre around? borisjohnson and other leave campaigners claimed that in august 2014 the uk gave £350 million a week to the eu.
4:43 pm
the uk's gross contribution was actually £361 million, but crucially the rebate is removed before any money sent to brussels. so the amount sent to the eu in 2014 was £276 million a week, after the rebate. brexiteers insist there will be huge sums to reclaim after we leave. everybody knows it is an awful lot of money. so wouldn't it be more productive to discuss how we will spend that money when we come out, and also to discuss the point that many of us don't think there is any moral or political or legal reason to go on paying them, once we have left. indeed, i think it would be illegal to go on paying them once we have left. this tussle over numbers is a side story to the debate still going on in the cabinet about what brexit looks like, just days before theresa may is due to make a major speech to try and break the deadlock in the negotiations.
4:44 pm
downing street said it was important that all cabinet ministers were united around the government's decision. but borisjohnson's intervention, setting out his own ideas. theresa may is visiting canada. mrs may's visit comes ahead of days before a new trade deal between the eu and canada coming into effect. what a tremendous pleasure to welcome prime minister may to canada. this is actually for all the times that we've met and talked, we haven't had a formal sit down, by lateral like this. it seems like we have had so many opportunities. i
4:45 pm
can't believe we haven't done this. this is a great opportunity to talk about many issues in advance of the united nations general assembly. there will be as of the rest of the week opportunities to talk about the trade relationship that we are excited about deepening particularly with the c e.t. a coming into provisional application later this week, but also the opportunities to continue working closely with the united kingdom as it moves forward with brexit. we are going to make sure that the relationship between canada and the uk stays as strong as it always has been and continues to stay stronger with a seamless transition, but there is a lot for us transition, but there is a lot for us to talk about and it is a real pleasure to see you here again. well, it is very good to be here. this is my first visit to can darks but it is great that in my first visit i'm able to have meetings with you and to come here to the parliament. as you say, there is a an awful lot for us to talk about in
4:46 pm
our by lateral relationship, how we can build on the relationship, the very important trade relationship we signed up to with the european union, how that goes forward, but also there are many issues on which we very much think alike and we can build on including the agenda that you have in relation to women's empowerment and what we can do around the world and then the various foreign policy issues that we will be looking at including issues like modern slavery and how we can deal with the use of the internet by terrorists and the way in which propaganda, is put around on the internet and what we can do together to deal with it. so i'm very pleased to be able to be here. unlike some of the leaders you welcome here... that's all right. thank you very much. thank you very much.
4:47 pm
thank you. well, that was a comfortable watch. s e.t. a isa well, that was a comfortable watch. s e.t. a is a the trade agreement which was signed by the european union and canada after a long delayed landmark trade deal. just so you know! so it better serves the people we all represent. we support your effo rts all represent. we support your efforts to look across the entire system and to find ways the united nations can better and be better at development, management, peace, and security. 20 years ago today, the people of wales voted for devolution and the creation of a national assembly. today the welsh secretary alun
4:48 pm
cairns says that wales needs to respond to modern challenges and that more powers should be handed to welsh regions rather than ministers controlling everything from cardiff. we can now speak to the first minister of wales, carwynjones who is at the senedd. congratulations. i know there are celebrations going on. when you reflect on the last 20 years, what do you think has been achieved? well, many things, but i can sum it up well, many things, but i can sum it up in one word confidence. wales in the early 1990s was a place that lacked confidence. it had been hammered economically by successive conservative governments, young people were leaving, didn't want to stay and there appeared to be no future. that's changed. we are a confident nation. we see our young people staying and we have unemployment now that's usually at a level below the uk average. that would have been unheard of in the 90s and of course, we're able to ta ke 90s and of course, we're able to take decisions for selves, it is not a man sitting in an office takes a
4:49 pm
decision. 20 years ago, what were you doing and what would you have said this is where wales will be in 2017? well, i was part of the yes campaign. i remember the roller—coaster of the results night clearly. but if you said to me that i would be standing here in what is soon i would be standing here in what is soon to become a tax raising, it is a law making parliament as it soon will be, that enjoys the support of 80% of the population, i would have been surprised at that time, but that's how we've come as a nation. you talk about a roller—coaster, what were the figures 53% against 49.7%ks and devolution, it's accepted across the uk? well, better in mained we had a referendum in 2011 that gave this institution further powers and that passed by nearly 2—1 for a institution that people were sceptical of. the journey we have taken has been a significant one in that time. people are comfortable with the fact that they are able to elect the
4:50 pm
politicians that take day—to—day decisions in wales in the way they weren't able to do in 1997. what's your impression about how attitudes to the welsh have changed in the uk? not always brilliant if i can put it that way. but i think the euros last year made a significant difference to the way wales was perceived. there are some lazy attitudes we still come across. unemployment must be high in wales. it is not, it is lower than london. and lower than england for months. the best gcses. we're building schools as with inn england, schools are not being built. come and look at what is happening in wales, the exciting things that are happening in wales. there are one or two things that need to be done. i heard alan cairns saying we should decentralise power from cardiff as the very time that they are trying to hoard powers in westminster. is that the biggest
4:51 pm
threat to the process that you have made over the last 20 years? years? how worried are you about brexit? made over the last 20 years? years? how worried are you about brexit7m isa how worried are you about brexit7m is a serious challenge. president situation is that, in areas that we already control, powers that are at the moment in brussels will come to us. the moment in brussels will come to us. what's the uk are trying to do is saying, no, you are not going to get those powers, we will hold on to those. we will give ourselves the powers to amend welsh laws without referring to you or the uk parliament eitherfor referring to you or the uk parliament either for that matter. that's not what people voted for. i remember people saying they wanted power to return. they didn't say let's turn london into the new brussels. they wanted to make sure that powers come back to where they should be and we work together as four nations. that's got to be the sensible way forward. carr win, that's a fabulous building behind you. we're lucky. it works. it was built, it was a modern design. it is
4:52 pm
visited by hundreds of people every week. it is open weekends and what's hugely important even in these days of increased security, we can welcome people into this building. this building is owned by the people of wales and not by politicians. ca rwyn of wales and not by politicians. carwyn jones, thank you very of wales and not by politicians. carwynjones, thank you very much for your time this afternoon. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first the headlines on bbc news: ryanair says it expects claims of around 20 million euros in compensation after plans to cancel up to 50 flights a day. police are still questioning two men arrested after the parsons green bombing including a 21—year—old syrian refugee. downing street has insisted the cabinet is united behind the government's brexit plans, despite borisjohnson publishing his own view of negotiations last week. hello i'm jamie robertson. the markets in recovery mode today
4:53 pm
after the sharp falls at the end of last week. that was a lot to do with the strength in the pound, which meant that many of the companies in the ftse100 index were seeing their overseas income suffer as a result. the pound has been rising largely because of expectations that the bank of england will raise interest rates possibly as early as by the end of this year. so although the pound has slipped back a little today it's still close to the highest it's been since the referendum. there's been a survey from the research group markit which shows the kind of pressure that household budgets are coming under because of low growth in wages and higher inflation — and it could get worse if interest rates go up by any significant degree. and ryanair has been making waves. it's had to cancel some 50 flights a day, and has now said it will publish a list of flights which it will cancel in the next six weeks
4:54 pm
at a cost of about 20 million euros in compensation to passengers. let's get detailed analysis of this with jeremy stretch from cibc markets. the ryanair story the rya nair story is the ryanair story is extraordinary. it isa the ryanair story is extraordinary. it is a management mess—up. that's a word that's been used a lot. which is not something you associate with ryanair, is it? no, it is normally an operation that's run and managed tightly, but it seems to have an administrative error. and certain pilots wanting to utilise their holiday entitlements. it does appear that ryanair are holiday entitlements. it does appear that rya nair are losing holiday entitlements. it does appear that ryanair are losing a number of their pilots to a rival operation and that might suggest to some that perhaps there might be contractual issues which are causing some of the pilots to jump ship and that maybe an issue which the company may find is more intrabletable problem over the medium run. on to macroeconomics and macrobusiness which is sterling.
4:55 pm
it has been a big feature of the last few days. there is a feeling at the moment that interest rates are going to be going up and that's why the pound is stronger? yes, we have seen a the pound is stronger? yes, we have seen a substantial repricing of uk interest rate expectations. that was really stoked by the bank of england's statement on thursday which was added to by the governor and one of the leading members on friday. however, in the last half an hour, we have seen mr carney speaking in washington just adding a little bit of rider to the comments to still considerable risks and that may limit the rate certainty and that might compromise sterling's valuation a little bit. so i think markets may pear back. the bank are mindful of the risks and will be predicated towards a rate hike in the not too distant future. jeremy, all bound up with that is the
4:56 pm
squeeze on household budgets? yes, that's right. it is one rather ironic that the market are talking about the squeeze on the household wallets being at the highest level in three years at the same time as the bank has started to reawaken the possibility of tighter monetary policy or higher interest rates. that would make the process even worse for the consumers and that's one of the factors which will be an influence on the bank of england over the medium run. earnings are still static despite the low level of unemployment and we will see inflation remaining elevated for the next month or two and we will see prices on the cpr series rising for the next two months before we start to see a peak. jeremy, thank you very much. the markets. there stt pound against the dollar. just below its peak. that's the business, back to you, simon. a look at what's been going on in cambridgeshire. police there
4:57 pm
detained a swan for road rage offences and obstructing a highway! you know what a swan looks like and a police car. put the two together. a difficult story to tell without pictures! thank you, everybody for that. let's geta, oh, thank you, everybody for that. let's get a, oh, hang thank you, everybody for that. let's geta, oh, hang on. there thank you, everybody for that. let's get a, oh, hang on. there it is. you see, i was right. a police car, a swa n see, i was right. a police car, a swan and arrest. the weather. matt taylor. it is not great in the caribbean. in is the seventh one. hurricane maria. the cloud is approaching to the east of martinique. winds in excess of 120mph. the winds could strengthen further. it could be a category 4
4:58 pm
storm as it reaches midweek across the virgin islands. we will keep you updated at bbc weather centre. let's show you what's happening here. we have got shower clouds across england and wales. producing the odd rumble of thunder. a lot of cloud across northern scotland and down into northern england. that could bring light patchy rain and drizzle. the far west of the uk is where you have got the driest and clearest conditions and that will be the case all night long. 0utbreaks conditions and that will be the case all night long. outbreaks of rain and drizzle will push across england and drizzle will push across england and wales overnight and clearing for most in the south—east. but with clearing skies, lighter winds, a few mist and fog patches and again these are the city centre temperatures, single figures, we could get close toa single figures, we could get close to a frost. soa to a frost. so a fresh morning commute out there. there will be one or two isolated showers. but overall, it
4:59 pm
will be the driest sunniest day of the week. most will stay with sunny spells. more cloud in the morning, particularly to the west in the afternoon as the breeze freshens up, with more sunshine, it will feel warmer than recent days. warmer still as you go into the middle part of the week. we have got low pressure out to the west of ireland heing to drag up warmer airfrom the mid—atlantic. milder conditions to ta ke mid—atlantic. milder conditions to take us into wednesday morning. to come with the milder air does come wind and rain. scotland and northern ireland on wednesday. spreading into northern parts of england. central and eastern areas of england after a cloudy start with rain, dry and bright here into the afternoon with sunny spells and feeling warm in the sunshine too. and the milder air lasts as we go through the night and into thursday operating it from the ferber conditions, this zone of wet weather. temperatures in the sunshine to the east of that, around 19 to 21 celsius. mid—teens further
5:00 pm
west, but across the western parts of the uk, there will be sunshine too. bye for now. today at 5pm, the budget airline ryanair says it's "messed up" the rotas of it's pilots, leading to the cancellation of thousands of flights, well into 0ctober. after mounting pressure, details of all the affected flights will now be published, and the compensation bill could be as much as 20 million euros. when we make a mess at ryanair we come out with our hands up, we try to explain where we have made a mess, we will pay compensation to those passengers entitled to compensation, which are those flights that have been cancelled. after concerted efforts to improve the airline's image, where does this latest controversy leave the company? the other main stories on bbc news at 5. police are continuing to question two men, in connection with last week's bomb attack on a london tube train. both are thought to be refugees from iraq and syria.

16 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on